After picking up my three EZE-Lap diamond plates, I wanted to house them in a plate holder, much like the one used by Paul Sellers in his sharpening videos. It is not a new concept, but it really appeals to me to have the stones all in one unit, making sharpening a tool a quicker, slicker process. For info on Paul’s plate,. you can click Here.

For my plate I wanted to make use of some 11″ x 1″ boards that I had salvaged out of a skip/Dumpster.

The four salvaged boards. Exactly as they were found. Incredible what people will throw away!

The four salvaged boards. Exactly as they were found. Incredible what people will throw away!

I wanted the plates to have a 1″ boarder and a 1″ gap between them. The EZE-Lap plates are 8″ x 3″ so the dimensions I needed were approximately 10″ x 11″ board. I say Approximately as the plates have some variance in their finished dimensions, so rather than cut my board to absolute lengths, I laid the plates out using a 1″ wide rule as a guide, then cut and marked the layout from there.

Laying out the plates on the holder top get things aligned

Laying out the plates on the holder top get things aligned using a 1″ wide rule.

After using a marking knife to define where my recesses will be, I then make the cross-grain cuts more defined using a chisel.

Using a chisel to further define the cross-grain knife marks.

Using a chisel to further define the cross-grain knife marks.

Do this for all of your cross-grain cuts, but NOT for the cuts along the grain, as you run a risk of moving the line or evening making a new line, ruining the marking. You will deal with the along grain marks after taking some meat out of the recesses.

All cross-grain marks defined more,

All cross-grain marks defined more.

With the cross-grain marks defined, you can then deepen the cross-grain lines by holding your chisel vertically, well aligned with the back of the chisel against the “knife-wall” and using a chisel hammer/mallet to give them a few wallops.

The next step is to then start removing material from the middle of the recesses, using your chisel bevel down. This ensures that the wood only splits as deep as the vertical chops you made earlier. With this done, you can then start to look at removing the main waste from the recess. I would also suggest taking care here and removing a small amount of material from the the top of the recesses where the along grain knife marks are, this will reduce the likelihood of any mishaps in removing the bulk of the recess waste.

Waste removed from the sides of the recess up to the cross grain knife marks

Waste removed from the sides of the recess up to the cross grain knife marks

I used a 1″ chisel to remove the bulk of the waste from my recesses and then moved to a “poor man’s router”, much like the one I used in the Workbench Build.

The bulk of the waste removed, again using the chisel bevel down.

The bulk of the waste removed, again using the chisel bevel down.

The Poor Man's Router being used to clean up the recesses.

The Poor Man’s Router being used to clean up the recesses.

With the recesses chopped to a depth of around 1/8″ and all high spots removed, the next step is to cut a fourth recess on the back of the holder to allow for a bench-hook style insert to be fitted. I was lucky enough to have a perfect off-cut (from ripping my board down) for the job. I marked around this using a knife and then chopped the recess with a 1″ chisel. This method of chopping was slightly different from the recesses for the plates as this hook piece will run the full length of the holder and it runs along the grain. So I cut the recess for the hook in a similar way that you would cut a recess for a hinge.

Rear recess marked out and initial chops made.

Rear recess marked out and initial chops made.

Again, use your chisel and then a router plane to clean out this final recess.

With this finished, all that is left is a bt of glue up and fitting the plates into the holder. I made my recesses sufficiently tight enough to hold the plates in with compression. I have read about adding a bead of silicon or even glue to hold the plates in place, but for now this works fine for me.

To see this holder being made, please check out my video below. Hopefully you enjoy the vid.

I have not added a finish at this stage, although I am debating adding some boiled linseed oil. If anyone has any suggestions or questions, then please let me know in the comments below.

The finished sharpening plate.

The finished sharpening plate.

Side view of the finished holder

Side view of the finished holder

Thanks all

~Alistair

 

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