As a quick side note, I thought I would post a quick picture of the coach screws and dome head bolts that I used for this project, for reference:

3 Coach screws and 1 Dome head bolt

3 Coach screws (2″, 3″ and 3 1/2″) all M10 and 1 Dome head bolt 6″ Long

 

While it is initially intimidating, fitting the vice to the bench is a relatively straightforward process. I know that a number of people have written about using a support to clamp in the jaws of the vice so that it sits at the correct height, but I have to be honest and say I cheated and asked for a helping pair of hands to hold the vice in place while I bolted it to the bench. For fitting the vice, I used 3″ M8 coach screws to fix through the jaw of the vice, through the apron and into the bench top itself. I also used 2 1/2″ M10 Coach Screws to fix the casting to the underneath of the bench top.

Shot of the coach screws securing the jaw to the apron.

Shot of the coach screws securing the jaw to the apron.

Same thing, different angle.

Same thing, different angle.

 

Underside of the bench top showing the casting fixings plus the additional spacer washers

Underside of the bench top showing the casting fixings plus the additional spacer washers

Close Up of the additional washer technique

Close Up of the additional washer technique

Because the casting of the rear vice jaw is out of square, I had to use a combination of washers to pack the space between the vice body and the underside of the bench-top. I just used whichever washers I had to hand and played around with combinations of thick washers and thin washers to get the fit just right.

So with the vice secrurely fastened to the bench, the next step was to install some jaw liners to the vice. I happened to have some old Oak floor boards in the garage that I had been given around a year ago. Until this point I had not intended using them in the bench build, but seeing as they were there, I thought, “why not, eh?” Because they were to be used as flooring, they had tongue and groove moulded into their edges. Step one was to remove this using my handy Stanley No4.

End Profile view of the Oak Flooring

End Profile view of the Oak Flooring

Removing the tongue one loving shaving at a time!

Removing the tongue one loving shaving at a time!

After removing tongue and groove profile, I cut the first jaw liner to length. The jaws on the vice are 9 1/16″ long, so I opted to make the liner overhang the jaws by 1 1/2″ on either side, totalling 12 1/16″ in length.

With one jaw liner cut roughly to size, time to get the second one sorted

With one jaw liner cut roughly to size, time to get the second one sorted

After cutting the second Jaw Liner to size, I prepared two “spacer blocks” that would be affixed to the bench apron just either side of the rear vice jaw. This would then allow the rear jaw liner to be fixed to these blocks instead of using the holes provided in the rear jaw itself.

Both Jaw liners and spacer block cut

Both Jaw liners and spacer block cut

To make sure that the rear jaw liner was positioned correctly, I used the same method as described by Paul Sellers in his blog. Place the liners between the jaws of the vice and then tighten the vice so that the bolts that sit against the rear jaw creating an impression on the rear jaw liner. These impressions can then be used to locate some recesses that will allow the liner to sit flush with the jaw of the vice.

An impression made by the bolts in the rear jaw liner

An impression made by the bolts in the rear jaw liner

Both impressions can be seen in this shot

Both impressions can be seen in this shot

 

Boring out some recesses for taking the bolt heads

Boring out some recesses for taking the bolt heads using a brace and bit

Planing the tops of the jaw so that they are flush with the bench top

Planing the tops of the jaw so that they are flush with the bench top

With both jaws lined up, marked and planed to the level I wanted, all that was left to do was to fit them to the vice/bench using the appropriate screws.

Fixing both spacer blocks to the apron, one screw used for each, 2 1/2" No8 screws

Fixing both spacer blocks to the apron, one screw used for each, 2 1/2″ No8 screws

The front Jaw liner is fixed using two 1" No10 screws and the rear Jaw liner fixed using four 3 1/2" No8 screws, two on each side

The front Jaw liner is fixed using two 1″ No10 screws and the rear Jaw liner fixed using four 3 1/2″ No8 screws, two on each side

The Finished Vice arrangement

The Finished Vice arrangement

Bench complete with finish, vice and jaw liners and with unprepared central insert

Bench complete with finish, vice and jaw liners and with unprepared central insert

With the vice and Jaw Liners fitted, the bench is functioning and fully able to be used to work wood. In my next post about the bench I will cover adding the central insert to the workbench. You can read this article Here.

**Addition: After a year of use, the jaw liners and vice have worked just fine without any issues. It has been extremely solid and a great help to my woodworking.

Thanks for reading

~Alistair

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